email: tfl3543@blackfoot.net

BEAR RIVER ZEOLITE CO., INC.
4005 East Glendale Road
Preston, ID 83263

tel: 406-827-3523
fax: 406-827-3543

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DAIRY COWS
(download dairy cow brochure)


ANIMAL NUTRITION

Some of the following benefits are well accepted and are not referenced in the bibliography. Other benefits that BRZ™ cannot claim due to U.S. Government restrictions can be found in the publications listed in the reference section.

AVERAGE DAILY GAIN (ADG)

The CEC of the zeolite allows the exchange of ammonium from feed stuffs upon digestion.  In cows, the ammonium is released when it comes back to the rumen (sodium from the saliva exchanges with the ammonium) and creates a “time release” of the ammonium for better utilization of the nitrogen. 3, 6, 7

CONVERSION RATE REDUCTION

The conversion rate of feed to gain is decreased due to better utilization of the nitrogen. 3, 6, 7

RUMEN BUFFER

Feeding low sodium clinoptilolite mediates rumen PH. 2, 3

MYTOXIN BINDER

Zeolites effectively absorb mycotoxins containing polar groups such as aflatoxins. Zeolite’s binging and desiccant properties also inhibit
dysentery. 2, 7, 8, 10

ODOR AND MOISTURE CONTROL

One of the major causes of odor from animals is the generation of ammonia gas from urea and manure that become the aerosol for odors. BRZ™  captures ammonium and prevents the formation of ammo0nia. BRZ™  zeolite holds 55% of its weight in water, an attribute that results in dryer stalls and a reduction in manure fly pressure.

MANURE HOLDS MORE NITROGEN

In 30 days the loss of 30% nitrogen in the manure was cut to 10% by feeding clinoptilolite. Zeolite exchanges and holds ammonium before it oxidizes as ammonia. 3

MILK PRODUCTION INCREASED

Proper amounts of zeolite in the TMR enhance milk production.

HEAVY METAL REMOVAL

Feeding zeolite removes heavy metals from the rumen, such as 91% of lead, 45% of cadmium and many other metals. 7, 11

UREA ADVANTAGES

The risk of toxicity due to the increase in PH and ammonium levels in the rumen is mitigated by using zeolite. 1

DI-CALCIUM PHOSPHATE RATION REDUCTION

When fed to an animal, the zeolite exchanges with the calcium in “di-cal” to help solubilize the phosphate. The net effect is that the di-cal ration can be reduced because the phosphate is better utilized and the bone growth is enhanced. 3

 

RECOMMENDED RATIONS

ANIMAL

TMR/ANIMAL

Dairy cows or cattle

4-5 oz/day

Calves

2 oz/day

Chickens (layers and broilers)

0.5% TMR

Turkeys

0.6-0.7% TMR

Hogs

1% TMR

Sheep

0.1% TMR

 

REFERENCES

1.       Bergero, D. et al, 1997, Effect of natural clinoptilolite in the feeding or Phillipsite in the feeding of lactating dairy cows, natural zeolites – Sofa, 1995, pp 67-72.

2.       Boyer, Julie, 2000, Zeolite in animal nutrition, seminar, McGill University, Animal Science Department.

3.       Eng, K et al, 2003, Adding potassium clinoptilolite zeolite and yucca extract feedlot diets to reduce nitrogen losses from manure, J. Animal Sci, vol 81.

4.       EFSA, 2007, Opinion of the Scientific Panel on additives and products or substances used in animal feed on the safety of zeolite for the reduction of, or risk of milk fever in dairy cows.

5.       Hale, E.C., 2005, Reduction of ammonia emission and phosphorus excretion in laying hen manure through feed manipulation. Symposium on the state of the science: Animal manure and waste management, January 2005, San Antonio, Texas.

6.       Loughbrough, R., 1993, Minerals for animal feed in a stable market, Industrial Minerals, March 1993, pp 19-33.

7.       Mumpton, Freerick A., 1998, La roca magic: Uses of natural zeolites in agriculture and Industry. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, v 96, Issue 7, pp 3463-3470, March 30, 1998.

8.       Ramos, A.J., mand Herman, E., 1977, Prevention of aflatoxicosis in farm animals by means od hydrated sodium and calcium aluminosilicates addition to feed stuff: A review, Animal Feed Science and Technology, Vol 65, p.17-206.

9.       Sandifer, Bill, 2004, Rose Acres fights fumes, November 15, 2004, Washington Daily News, Local News.

10.    Tomasevic-Canovic, M. et al, 2002, Surfactant modified zeolites. New efficient adsorbents for mycotoxins. Belgrade, Yugoslavia and College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri.

11.    Vrzgula, L. and Seidel, 1989, Sorption characteristics of natural zeolite (clinoptilolite) in biological material in vitro.